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of the speeches you've made recently i've been going over them, you talk a lot about nato and the fact that the experience in afghanistan is not -- >> it's not over yet. >> it hasn't been a terrifically happy one for nato and that that might sort of lead to a process in which we just don't have the will anymore or the intention to stay on the same scale we've been before particularly given the perception that our partners are not pulling their weight. how do you think we are going to be able to keep nato going? what would it take, in your view, to sustain nato and keep it relevant given our budgetary restrictions? >> well, i think an intervening event that poses a threat, um, we saw a little resurgence of nato in the libya situation where clearly the united states was not going to take the lead, was going to supply reconnaissance, intelligence, surveillance and a little bit of back up. but it was either nato getting together and going forward or not. that was the threat of, you know, the threat of a destabilized libya, the immigration consequences of that for southern europe, the histo
was going to become engaged through nato in ways that met our interest, i think, at the time, and got the job done. i thought it was smart. i thought the way he approached that was, in fact, very effective. and the results, obviously, were exactly what we wanted to achieve. we could tell if we did this, senator mccain you were deeply involved in that, we recommended no fly. we pushed for certain things, and those things were put into place. and it was affected without american boots being put on the ground at a time where we had just come out of iraq and we have american soldiers, largest number, in afghanistan. and so i think the american people approved of the way in which that was handled. now, the aftermath of all of these places -- i asked every member of the committee, we need to spend some time on this, all of us. there is a monumental transformation taking place. this is the biggest upheaval in that part of the world since the ottoman empire. since it came apart. as all of us know, many of the countries lines drawn, were drawn in relatively arbitrary fashion. people were put i
and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for being with us. as we watch this live shot of the entrance to the west wing of the white house where we're expecting the president and the first lady to come out any moment now to go to the limousine and take the trip of 1.6 miles to the capital for his second inauguration. mr. secretary, thank you for your time. >> thank you. >>> john dickerson, our cbs 23450us -- news political director is down there on the national
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